Male Breast Enlargement is Actually Common

Male Breast Enlargement is Actually Common

Male Breast Enlargement is Actually Common
  • Healboat
  • December 9th, 2017
  • Views 287

Technically known as Gynecomastia, it refers to a condition where male breasts get enlarged. This problem is more common in middle aged and older men. 

In recent, there has been a considerable rise in the incidents of male breast enlargement. According to a study, it has been found that between 40 and 50 percent of men come across this problem at some point in their lives. Technically known as Gynecomastia, it refers to a condition where male breasts get enlarged. This problem is more common in middle aged and older men.

However, the increasing awareness of the disease makes it easier for men and aged boys to find the right
treatmentto this problem. According to a recent study, “Nearly half of all men will experience breast tissue growth during their lifetimes, but many are unaware of it or are too embarrassed to even discuss the problem with their doctor.”

On a medical note, this condition is defined when a rubbery or firm mass of tissue spreads concentrically around the nipples. In about half
ofcases it takes place in both breasts. Another reason behind this condition is pseudogynecomastia in which fat deposition without increase in glandular tissue takes place.

The next condition that affects men is breast cancer. Breast cancer in men is generally only found on one side and the growth does not take place proportionally to the nipple. It may also present with skin dimpling and nipple discharge.

Gynecomastia is generally found to affect infant,
adolescentand older males, or it can be a side effect of drugs or a disorder such as chronic kidney disease, androgen deficiency, hyperthyroidism, and testicular tumor.

Patients with physiologic gynecomastia do not require further evaluation. Similarly, asymptomatic and pubertal gynecomastia does not require further tests and should
berevaluated in 6 months. Further evaluation is necessary for the following situations:

  • Breast size greater than 5 cm (macromastia)
  • A lump that is tender, of recent onset, progressive, or of unknown duration
  • Signs of malignancy (eg, hard or fixed lymph nodes or positive lymph node findings)

General management considerations are as follows:

  • As a rule, no treatment is required for physiologic gynecomastia
  • Pubertal gynecomastia resolves spontaneously within several weeks to 3 years in most patients; breasts larger than 4 cm in diameter may not regress completely
  • Identifying and managing an underlying primary disorder often alleviates breast enlargement
  • For patients with idiopathic gynecomastia or with residual gynecomastia after treatment of the primary cause, medical or surgical treatment may be considered.
  • If medical therapies are used, they should be tried early in the condition’s course

Pharmacologic agents used to treat gynecomastia include the following:

  • Clomiphene
  • Tamoxifen
  • Danazol (less commonly used)

Surgical approaches that may be considered include the following:

  • Reduction mammoplasty: Considered in cases of macromastia, long-standing gynecomastia, or failed medical therapy, as well as for cosmetic reasons
  • More extensive plastic surgery: May be considered in cases of marked gynecomastia or excessive sagging of the breast tissue from weight loss
  • Endoscopic subcutaneous mastectomy, without skin excision
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